What is Presbyopia?

Presbyopia is a condition associated with aging of the eye that results in progressively worsening ability to focus clearly on close objects. Presbyopia is a natural part of the aging process. The eye is not able to focus light directly onto the retina due to the hardening of the natural lens. Aging also affects muscle fibers around the lens making it harder for the eye to focus on up close objects. The ineffective lens causes light to focus behind the retina, causing poor vision for objects that are up close.Presbyopia usually becomes noticeable in your early to mid-40s and continues to worsen until around age 65.

You may first notice these signs and symptoms

  • A tendency to hold reading material farther away to make the letters clearer

  • Blurred vision at normal reading distance.

  • Eyestrain or headaches after reading or doing close work

 

A basic eye exam can confirm presbyopia. Eyeglasses with bifocal or progressive addition lenses (PALs) are the most common correction for presbyopia. Bifocal means two points of focus: the main part of the spectacle lens contains a prescription for distance vision, while the lower portion of the lens holds the stronger near prescription for close work. Reading glasses are another choice. Unlike bifocals and PALs, which most people wear all day, reading glasses typically are worn just during close work.

“Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference.”
— Winston Churchill...

“Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference.” Winston Churchill