Mold in the home

During the winter, activities at home can lead to increased humidity and moisture indoors and, unfortunately, this can lead to the growth of mold. Whether it's the slimy black spots on your shower curtain, the fuzzy white patches on your basement floor, or the slick orange film that forms on your kitchen drain, household mold is more than unsightly. In some cases, mold in your home can make you sick, especially if you have allergies or asthma.Whether or not you're allergic to molds, mold exposure can irritate your eyes, skin, nose, throat, and lungs.

 

Here's what you can do to combat mold problems:

  • Use dehumidifiers and air conditioners, especially in hot, humid climates, to reduce moisture in the air.

  • Keep air conditioning drip pans clean. Make sure drain lines are free of obstructions and flow properly.

  • Keep the house warm in cool weather. As the temperature goes down, the air is less able to hold moisture and it condenses on cold surfaces, which can encourage mold growth.

  • Dry wet areas within 24 to 48 hours to prevent mold growth.

  • Open doors between rooms to increase circulation, which carries heat to cold surfaces. Increase air circulation by using fans and by moving furniture from wall corners.

  • Turn off certain appliances if you notice moisture on windows and other surfaces.

  • Vent your clothes dryer to the outside.

  • Avoid leaving damp clothes in the laundry basket or dryer. Wash and dry them promptly.

 

When cleaning mold from hard surfaces, commercial products, soap and water or a heavily-diluted bleach solution can be used. Always dry surfaces that have been cleaned thoroughly to prevent mold from growing back.

“Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference.”
— Winston Churchill...

“Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference.” Winston Churchill